committed to historic Baptist & Reformed beliefs

 

HISTORY

OF

Louisiana Negro

Baptists

BIOGRAPHIES.

MISS ELIZABETH NORRINGTON, NOTED SCHOLAR AND TEACHER.

        The lady whose biography we now pen is the daughter of Mr. Emanuel and Mrs. Eliza Norrington. She was born in the town of Minden, La., 1865. It was evident earl in life that she was endowed with a bright intellect. Her parents, though slaves, were firm believers in, and ardent supporters of Christian education. Though they had but little of this world's good, they set themselves to the task of educating their little daughter. After removing to New Orleans they first sent her to the Clio Public School. Having accomplished much here, they removed again to Shreveport, La., where Miss Elizabeth immediately entered school. Here she distinguished herself by showing that she had laid deep and broad a foundation for higher education. Accordingly her father sent her to Oberlin College, Oberlin, O. Here she was studious and industrious, being loved by her teachers and schoolmates. She often led in her examinations.

        After preparation for her life work, here at Oberlin, she came south and began teaching. As a teacher she has been and is a success, having won for herself not only a state-wide, but a country-wide reputation. She has held the following positions: First Assistant in Providence Academy, Shreveport La.; First Assistant in Antoine or Mt. Zion Public School, Shreveport, La., where she now (1914) labors to the satisfaction of the School Board and the patrons and to the delight of the children. Miss Norrington has served repeatedly in Summer Normal School Faculties as Model Teacher. She is Trustee and one of the Supervisors of The Heart's Ease Industrial Orphanage. This is one of the most accomplished women in the state, well read, a consistent Christian, model housekeeper and an exemplary teacher.

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