committed to historic Baptist & Reformed beliefs

 

 

PREFACE

 

THE period which is dealt with in this book is rich in lessons of heroic courage, endurance, and fidelity to conscience, but its main importance lies in the historic explanation which it supplies as to the origin and nature of the existing cleavage in English religious and ecclesiastical life. Separatism arose, in the first instance, upon a doctrine of the visible particular Church as distinct from the parish assembly of the Church of England, and also as a protest against the Royal Supremacy in matters ecclesiastical.

No one would dream of writing the story without availing himself of the invaluable researches of Drs. H. M. Dexter, John Brown, and F. J. Powicke. I have, however, also gone to the original records, in some instances to records which have only recently become accessible. I have frequently re- jected accepted tradition as to events and dates, and in one case, have practically re-written the story. It is impossible, in the limits of this work, to give references, but I trust that no one will put aside my conclusions without going to the originals as 1 have done. I desire to thank the Rev. T. G. Crippen, B.A., the librarian of the Congregational Library, who has placed its resources at my disposal, and also the Rev. W. T. Whitley, M.A., LL.D., for many valuable suggestions.

J. H. SHAKESPEARE. H IGHGATE, December 22, 1905.

 

CONTENTS

 

I.

Tim ENGLAND OF THE SEPARATISTS

?I.

RornT BROWNE

(i) The Making of a Congregationalist. (ii) Apostleship and Apostasy. III.

BA1ROW AND GREENWOOD

(i) Prisoners of Jesus Christ. (ii) Martyrdom.

Iv.

JOHN PKNRY AND THE MARTIN

 

CONTROVERSY 54

 

 

MARPRELATE

87 ?I PAGE 21