committed to historic Baptist & Reformed beliefs

 

Adoniram Judson

A Biography

By His Son

Edward Judson, D.D.

 

Philadelphia

American Baptist Publication Society

14-0 Chestnut Street

1894

 

PREFATORY NOTE

IT is my purpose in the following pages to present a clear and consecutive story of my father's life, which may be justly said to form the main artery of the American Foreign Missionary Enterprise. In order to do this I have essentially re-written the Memoir which I prepared ten years ago for Anson D. F. Randolph & Co., and have endeavored to meet the requirements of the younger generation of Christendom. Free use has also been made of the personal reminiscences contributed by the fascinating pen of Mrs. Emily C. Judson to Dr. Wayland's noble and comprehensive Memoir, now out of print. In view of the recent fire in Tremont Temple, which consumed the memorials of my father in the possession of the American Baptist Missionary Union, it gives me now peculiar satisfaction to remember that I went carefully through all those precious journals and letters of his which are now lost forever.

E. J.
NEW YORK, 1894

 

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.
Early Years. 1788-1809.
Birth - Family - Education - Conversion
Infidel sentiments - Rededication

 

CHAPTER II.
Consecration to Missionary Life. 1809-1812.
Samuel Nott, Jr., Samuel J. Mills, Jr., James Richards, Luther Rice,
and Gordon Hall - American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions
Marriage to Ann Hasseltine - Ordination - Bound for Calcutta

 

CHAPTER III.
Voyage to Burma. 1812-1813.
Becomes a Baptist - Arrives in Calcutta - Welcomed by Dr. Carey
Mr. and Mrs. Judson baptized - East India Company - Voyage
to Isle of France (Mauritius) - Madras - Arrives in Rangoon, 1813
Change in denominational attitude

 

CHAPTER IV.
Burma and Buddhism.
Country of Burma - People - Commerce - Agriculture - Government
Buddhism and Brahminism - Doctrine of transmigration of souls - Buddha

 

CHAPTER V.
Life in Rangoon. 1813-1819.
Spreading the Gospel by tracts, catechisms, Scripture portions
Preaching and the Zayat - Persecution - Ill health - Death of son, Roger
Translation of Gospel of Matthew completed - Government harrassement
First public worship service held - First Burman convert baptized
More conversions and baptisms

 

CHAPTER VI.
Life in Rangoon. (Continued). 1819-1823.
Journey to Ava - Present petition to the Emperor - Petition denied
Return to Rangoon - More conversions and baptisms - Mrs. Judson's ill health
Three months at Serampore, near Calcutta - Mrs. Judson leaves for America
Mrs. Judson returns to Rangoon after absence of two years and three months
Native church-membership in Rangoon grows from ten to eighteen
Translation of the New Testament into Burmese completed
Seek to plant a mission in Ava, the capital of Burma

 

CHAPTER VII.
Life in Ava and Oung-pen-la. 1823-1826.
Leave Rangoon for Ava - Impending war - War breaks out
Judson seized and imprisioned for twenty-one months
Physical and mental torture

 

CHAPTER VIII.
Life in Amherst. 1826-1827.
Treaty of peace signed - Return to Rangoon where
native church-membership has been reduced to four faithful converts
Leave Rangoon with the four believers to start new work in Amherst
Mrs. Judson dies - Translation work continues - Daughter Maria dies
Mission moved to Moulmein

 

CHAPTER IX.
Life in Moulmein. 1827-1831.
From Amherst to Moulmein - Judson's habit of prayer
Judson's self-denial, sacrifice, character - Zayat, school and translation work
Judson's brother Elnathan dies - Invitation to visit America after eighteen
years on field - George Dana Boardman

 

CHAPTER X.
Life in Moulmein (Continued). 1831-1845.
Judson returns to Moulmein - Labors among the Karens
Marries Sarah H. Boardman - Burman Bible completed - Daughter, Abby Ann, born
Birth of three sons; Adoniram Brown, Elnathan and Henry - Mrs. Judson's health fails
Little Henry dies at 1 yr. and 7 months - Another son born, named Henry
Home Board asks Judson to compile a Burman dictionary

 

CHAPTER XI.
Visit to America. 1845-1846.
Two more sons born; Charles and Edward - Mrs. Judson's health declines
Travel to United States - Mrs. Judson dies - Judson meets Miss Emily Chubbuck
Marriage to Emily Chubbuck - Six weeks later, they embark for Burma - Three oldest
children (Adoniram, Elnathan, and Abby) remain in United States

 

CHAPTER XII.
Last Years. 1846-1850.
Return to Moulmein - Missionary operation relocated to Rangoon
House in Moulmein burns to ground - Intolerance of Burmese government to Christianity
Continues work on dictionary - Sickness/lack of food - Discouragement and suffering
Judson's last words - Description of Judson as a person - Emily Frances born
Last communication to the Board - Sea voyage for health - Dies and is buried at sea
Ten days after his death, Mrs. Judson gives birth to her second child, named Charles,
who dies the same day

 

CHAPTER XIII.
Posthumous Influence.
Summary of accomplishments, etc.

 
 
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