committed to historic Baptist & Reformed beliefs

 

CHURCH POLITY

or

THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST,

in its

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL DEVELOPMENT.

BY J. L. REYNOLDS

 

Pastor of the Second Baptist Church, Richmond, Va.

FLUNT NON NASCUNTUR CHRISTIANI.?Tertul. Apol. 18.

 



RICHMOND, VA.
HARROLD & MURRAY, BROAD STREET.
BOSTON: GOULD, KENDALL & LINCOLN, 59 WASHINGTON ST.
1849.

 

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1849,

 

by HARROLD & MURRAY,

in the Clerk?s Office of the District Court of the United States for
the Eastern District of Virginia.

 

Reynolds, J. L., D. D., a native of Charleston, S.C., was born on the 17th of March, 1812. He graduated with the first honor at Charleston College, and from it went to Newton Theological Seminary, where he took the full course. His first pastorate was in Columbia, S. C. Thence he was called to the presidency of Georgetown College, Ky. After a successful service in that position, he became pastor of the Second Baptist church in Richmond,Va. He was called from Richmond to the professorship of Latin in the South Carolina College in the palmiest days of that renowned institution. ?For nearly twenty-five years the handsome, intellectual face and courtly manners of Dr. Reynolds were familiar in those classic halls, and hundreds of young men who read these lines will have tender memories revived of the genial and elegant Latin professor of their college days.? He was at length, at his own request, transferred to the chair of Moral Philosophy. After the war political changes dismissed him and the entire faculty of the college. In 1874 he became Professor of Latin in Furman University, from which position he was called to ?come up higher? on the 19th of December, 1877.

He was one of the most genial and delightful of companions. As a classical scholar, the Baptist ministry of South Carolina has not had his superior, if, indeed, his equal. As a preacher he was always instructive, and at times overwhelmingly eloquent and pathetic. The great gulf which he left has hot yet been filled. His wife, a fit helpmeet in talent and accomplishments, survived him but a short time, so that it might almost be said ?in death they were not divided.?

?William Cathcart, 1881

PREFACE.

 CHURCH POLITY has become the absorbing topic of the Christian world. In common with all thinking men, I have devoted considerable time to its examination; and have made some progress in the preparation of a volume with the design of exhibiting the polity of the New Testament, and tracing the gradual departures from it in the churches which succeeded those planted by the apostles. The completion of the work, on the plan proposed, will require several years, even under circumstances the most favorable to the prosecution of my labors. Perhaps I may not complete it at all. I have, therefore, yielded the more readily to the suggestion of my worthy friend, the editor of the Periodical Library, to prepare a smaller work,which is now submitted to the public. May the great Shepherd and Bishop of souls bless it to the instruction of the flock, for which he labored and died.

THE AUTHOR.
Mercer University, July, 1846.

PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION.

THE favorable reception with which this little book has met, has encouraged me to prepare a new and enlarged edition, which is now offered to the public, with the hope that it may contribute to the diffusion of correct sentiments on the subject of which it treats.

J. L. REYNOLDS.
Richmond, August, 1848.

 

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I. Statement of the subject

CHAPTER II. Sources of Proof

CHAPTER III. The Church of Christ

CHAPTER IV. Particular Churches

CHAPTER V. A Church, a Single Local Society

CHAPTER VI. Members of a Church

CHAPTER VII. Rights of a Church

CHAPTER VIII. Independence of the Churches

CHAPTER IX. Officers of a Church

CHAPTER X. Identity of Bishops and Elders

CHAPTER XI. Rights and Duties of Bishops

CHAPTER XII. The Deaconship

CHAPTER XIII. Ordination60

CHAPTER XIV. Baptism

CHAPTER XV. The Lord?s Supper

CHAPTER XVI. Relation of Churches to each other

CHAPTER XVII. Advantages of Scriptural Church Polity

CHAPTER XVIII. Corruption of Scriptural Church Polity

FOOTNOTES

 
 
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